Biology

Majors and Minors

Major Minor In-Seat Online

Courses

This course is a detailed study of the structure and function of the systems of the human body. Emphasis will be placed on cell biology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Designated critical thinking course.

For More Information on BIO 190

This course is a hands-on detailed study of anatomical terminology, microscopic examination of tissues, detailed study of the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems and the senses. Animal dissection required. Requires two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 190. Designated critical thinking.

For More Information on BIO 191

This course is a continuation of BIO 190 Anatomy and Physiology I, offering a detailed study of the structure and function of the systems of the human body. Emphasis will be on endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems, with consideration of metabolism, development, and inheritance. Prerequisites: BIO 190 and BIO 191. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 199.

For More Information on BIO 198

This course is a continuation of BIO 191 Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory. Emphasis will be on endocrine, cardio-vascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Exploration of the mechanisms of inheritance is included. Animal dissection is required. Requires two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO 190 and BIO 191. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 198.

For More Information on BIO 199

This course introduces basic microbiological principles and techniques. The course focuses on the fundamental nature of bacteria and other microorganisms; their morphology, physiology, and relationship to disease. Course consists of three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: One University level biology course with laboratory.

For More Information on BIO 225

This course introduces basic microbiological principles and laboratory techniques for manipulation, growth, and identification of microorganisms, especially bacteria. Course consists of two laboratory hour each week. Prerequisite: One University level biology course with laboratory. Pre or Corequisite: BIO 225.

For More Information on BIO 226

Introductory course in general biology. Emphasis on fundamental principles in the scientific method, biochemistry, cell structure and function, energy pathways, genetics, taxonomy, the study of anatomy and physiology of the plant. Three lecture hours per week. A student will not receive credit toward graduation requirements for both BIO 103 and BIO 155.

For More Information on BIO 103

An introductory laboratory providing studies in the scientific method, microscopy, structure and function of animal and plant cells; morphology, physiology, and taxonomy of plants; heredity. Two laboratory hours per week. Animal dissection not required. A student will not receive credit towards graduation requirements for both BIO 104 and BIO 156. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 103.

For More Information on BIO 104

A course designed to follow BIO 103 and BIO 104. The course will place emphasis on basic taxonomy, anatomy and physiology of animals, ecology, evolution, etiology and biogeography. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO 103 and BIO 104.

For More Information on BIO 105

An introductory laboratory investigating evolutionary relationships among organisms; identifying members of the Kingdoms of living organisms; studying structure and function relationships at the cell, tissue, organ, and organism level of organization. Two laboratory hours per week. Animal dissection is required. Prerequisites: BIO 103 and BIO 104. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 105. Designed critical thinking course.

For More Information on BIO 106

This is an introductory lecture course to the science of life which offers an overview of biological principles, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, ecology, a survey of the domains and kingdoms of living organisms, and the importance of biology to human society. Three hours lecture each week. A student will not receive credit toward graduation requirements for both BIO 103 and BIO 155. This course is designed for the non-science major.

For More Information on BIO 155

This is a laboratory study to accompany Exploring Life’s Diversity. Lab activities include scientific methods, microscope use, homeostasis, genetics, evolution, and a survey of plants and animals. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in BIO 155, Exploring Life’s Diversity. This course is designed for the non-science major. Two hours laboratory per week. A student will not receive credit toward graduation requirements for both BIO 104 and BIO 156.

For More Information on BIO 156

This course is a study of the basic linguistic principles inherent in the specialized vocabulary of medical and scientific fields. Prerequisite: None.

For More Information on BIO 204

This course examines the basic principles of plant biology with emphasis on ecology; morphology; physiology and taxonomy. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: BIO 103 and BIO 104.

For More Information on BIO 230

This course is the companion laboratory course to BIO 230 Principles of Botany (lecture). Includes field and laboratory work examining the basic principles of plant biology, with emphasis on ecology; morphology; anatomy, physiology and taxonomy. Two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO 103 and BIO 104; Prerequisite or corequisite BIO 230.

For More Information on BIO 231

A study of the relationship of cell structures to specialized cell functions, including growth, differentiation, biochemical activities and physiological behavior. Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisites: BIO 105 and BIO 106; CHM 175 and CHM 176.

For More Information on BIO 241

This course is a study of biochemical compounds and their role in intermediary metabolism. Special topics include biochemical energies and coenzyme mechanics. Prerequisites: CHM 330, and Pre or co- requisite BIO 325. Also listed as BIO 420.

For More Information on CHM 420

This course is a survey of the invertebrate and vertebrate phyla with emphasis on taxonomy, anatomy and physiology, behavior, ecology, life histories and phylogeny. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 105, and BIO 106.

For More Information on BIO 304

This course examines the global environmental problems associated with human population, species loss, soil erosion and desertification, air and water pollution, acid precipitation, ozone layer depletion, waste management, and a sustainable society. These issues are examined from a scientific viewpoint and placed in context of the cultural, religious, gender and socio-economic aspects that influence these issues. This course asks the student to identify possible solutions after careful study of environmental problems and to involve the student in some of these solutions. (This course meets Global/Environmental general education requirements for all majors). Course meets diversity requirement. Prerequisite: Any university level 3-hour Biology, Physical Science, or Environmental Science course. Also listed as ENV 305.

For More Information on BIO 305

A survey of the invertebrate and vertebrate fauna with emphasis on taxonomy and identification. Special emphasis is upon dissection detailing morphological relationships. Two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 105 and BIO 106. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 304.

For More Information on BIO 306

Topics courses are designed to allow for study of well-defined areas within the discipline that are not treated in regular coursework. Since prerequisites will vary among courses, students should refer to each semester’s Schedule of Academic Offerings before registering for a topics course.

For More Information on BIO 310

Basic concepts concerning the interrelationships of organisms and their environment. Topics: adaptations of plants and animals to their environments; species interactions; population, community, and ecosystem structure and dynamics; food webs; energy and nutrient flow. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 105, and BIO 106. Also listed as ENV 312. Designated interdisciplinary studies.

For More Information on BIO 312

This course provides an introduction to laboratory and field work in ecology. Exercises will be performed to acquaint students with sampling techniques used to gather both qualitative and quantitative data at the population, community, and ecosystem levels. Analyses of data will be performed. Two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 105, and BIO 106. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 312. Designated interdisciplinary studies. Also listed as ENV 313.

For More Information on BIO 313

This course is a survey of the vertebrate classes. Emphasis is placed on taxonomy, anatomy and physiology, behavior, ecology, life histories, and evolutionary relationships. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 105 and BIO 106.

For More Information on BIO 314

An intensive survey of the vertebrate classes of Kentucky fauna. Emphasis is placed on taxonomy and species identification. Special emphasis is upon dissection detailing morphological relationships. Two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 105, and BIO 106. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 314.

For More Information on BIO 315

This course is an examination of patterns and mechanisms of the first weeks of vertebrate life with emphasis on the molecular, cellular and genetic aspects of these developmental processes. Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 105, BIO 241, and BIO 106 OR BIO 190, BIO 191, BIO 198 and BIO 199. Corequisite: BIO 319 or consent of instructor.

For More Information on BIO 318

This course is the companion laboratory course to BIO 318 Vertebrate Embryology. This course is an examination of patterns and mechanisms of the first eight weeks of vertebrate life which emphasis on the molecular, cellular and genetic aspects of these developmental processes. Laboratory exercises focus on identification of organ systems’ formation in the frog, chick and pig embryos. Corequisite: BIO 318 or consent of instructor. Requires two laboratory hours per week.

For More Information on BIO 319

This course is the study of the characteristics of normal and aberrant vertebrate cells, tissue and organs as applied to the human body. Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 105, BIO 106 or BIO 190, BIO 191, BIO 198 and BIO 199; corequisite BIO 321.

For More Information on BIO 320

This course concentrates on the microscopic study of the characteristics of normal and aberrant vertebrate cells, tissues, and organs through study of prepared slides. Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 105, BIO 106 or BIO 190, BIO 191, BIO 198 and BIO 199; corequisite BIO 320.

For More Information on BIO 321

An introduction to the principles of heredity, molecular mechanisms of gene expression, replication, transcription and translation and an overview of molecular techniques and biotechnology using microbial, plant, and animal systems. Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 105, BIO 106, CHM 170, CHM 171, CHM 175 and CHM 176; Pre or Corequisite: CHM 330 and CHM 331.

For More Information on BIO 325

This course concentrates on the basic principles of immunological principles and their applications in the medical/veterinary field including antigen/antibody reactions laboratory methodology, autoimmune disorders, allergic reactions and tumor immunology. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: BIO 225, BIO 226, and CHM 170.

For More Information on BIO 326

This course concentrates on the basic laboratory procedures and their principles used in immunology testing and diagnosis of diseases. Two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 225, BIO 226, and CHM 170; Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 326.

For More Information on BIO 327

This course will serve to illustrate techniques typically utilized in genetics and molecular biology research and clinical application. DNA extraction, genetic exchange, gene amplification, protein analysis, and bioinformatics will be covered in this laboratory. This course is closely tied to the information learned in the BIO 325 Genetics and Molecular Biology lecture course, thus it is recommended that students enroll in both the lecture and laboratory courses. Genetic diseases and their treatments as well as ethical issues of genetics research will be covered in this course. Prerequisites: BIO 105 and BIO 106; CHM 175 and CHM 176; CHM 330 and CHM 331. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 325.

For More Information on BIO 328

Course assists the students in values clarification and identification and problem solving involving ethical dimensions of everyday practice in scientific research, health and environmental related professions. Prerequisite: Junior standing and 12 hours of biology. Also listed as ENV 401. Designated critical thinking.

For More Information on BIO 401

This course is an introduction to methods of biological research and writing. The topic for a senior research project is chosen, a literature search is started and a formal proposal is made; each of these must be approved by the professor and the research director. The research director may be a Midway University faculty member or a scientist at another facility, subject to professor’s approval. Prerequisite: Junior standing and a minimum of 12 hours each of biology and chemistry.

For More Information on BIO 405

As an interdisciplinary science, the focus of this course is the conservation of biodiversity at the levels of genetics, reproductive populations, species, communities, ecosystems, watersheds and air sheds, and the global biosphere. This course covers causative factors for the loss of biodiversity and the consequences for the future of systems stability and resilience. Current applications of evolutionary and ecological theory form the foundation for strategies and skills aimed at developing and implementing sound management policies. While human dimensions are important in natural resource management, this course emphasizes critical thinking and science-based problem solving. Also listed as ENV 415. Offered online only.

For More Information on BIO 415

Biochemistry Lab is a hands-on study of biochemical and molecular techniques used in various fields of biology. Two laboratory hours per week. CHM 330, and Pre or Corequisite BIO 325 and BIO 420. Also listed as CHM 421.

For More Information on BIO 421

This internship is an application of classroom skills and knowledge through biology-related job experience. An individually planned program allows students to gain work experience under the supervision of an intern director and a field supervisor. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and 12 semester hours of biology and approval of instructor. Also listed as ENV 485.

For More Information on BIO 485

Under the supervision of a scientist, students will conduct research to gather data for research papers to be completed in BIO 488. Prerequisite: Senior standing and satisfactory completion of BIO 405. Can be repeated for up to 4 credits. Second 2 credits will count as 2 credits of Major Electives.

For More Information on BIO 487

The student will, under scientist supervision, carry to completion an independent scientific research project of a biological nature. The data collected from BIO/MTH 487 will be used to write a scientific paper which will be edited and formatted into a document suitable for publication in a peer reviewed journal. Additionally, the student will present this work to faculty and students in a manner appropriate for presentation at a research conference. The project will be written in a scientific style suitable for publication and presented to faculty and students at completion. Prerequisite: Senior standing and satisfactory completion of BIO 405 and at least 2 credits of BIO/MTH 487.

For More Information on BIO 488

Last updated: 06/28/2021