Education

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Midway University has a long history of preparing educators. Current programs continue this tradition by offering three broad categories of programs: primary through grade five (P-5) Elementary, grades five through nine (5-9) Middle School, and Secondary Education English, Math, and Biology. Special Education Learning and Behavior Disorders (LBD) is an add-on concentration with any of these programs.

The Midway University Education program is delivered in three formats. Not all programs are available in all formats.

  1. Traditional semester format day program
  2. Accelerated evening/weekend eight-week format
  3. Online in eight-week segments except for Teacher Education Orientation, methods classes, and student teaching. The LBD concentration is offered online except for student teaching.

Checkpoints

All undergraduate Education majors are required to go through three checkpoints prior to graduation:
  1. Checkpoint I – Formal admission to the Education program
  2. Checkpoint II – Admission to student teaching
  3. Checkpoint III – Completion of the Education program following student teaching

Each checkpoint involves a portfolio, an interview, and additional requirements specific to each checkpoint. Candidates are permitted to enroll in a very limited number of EDU classes before being formally admitted to the Education program (EDU 103, EDU 108, EDU 201, and EDU 188, as needed). Candidates will not be able to take additional EDU courses until being formally admitted to the Education program.

Checkpoint requirements are described in the Education Handbook available in the Education Office or online and include:

  • State testing requirements for Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators (CORE) tests qualifying scores and Praxis II Core Academic Skills for Educators (CORE) professional testing requirements specific to each certificate area.
  • Minimum GPA of 2.75
  • Two hundred hours of field placement prior to student teaching. As part of this requirement, students must complete EDU 188, EDU 286, EDU 287, and EDU 288, as appropriate.
  • Six diversity hours minimum of multicultural field experience.
  • Local personnel requirements: TB test and criminal records check.

Student Learning Outcomes of Program

The Education programs adhere to the standards required by the Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB) and the Kentucky Department of Education. The Midway University program is approved by EPSB.

Standard 1. Learner development

The candidate shall understand how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and shall design and shall implement developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.

Standard 2. Learning differences

The candidate shall use the understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.

Standard 3. Learning environments

The candidate shall work with others to create environments that: support individual and collaborative learning; and encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

Standard 4. Content knowledge

The candidate shall: understand the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline he or she teaches; and create learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content.

Standard 5. Application  of content

The candidate shall understand how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.

Standard 6. Assessment

The candidate shall understand and use multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the educator's and learner's decision making.

Standard 7. Planning for instruction

The candidate shall plan instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.

Standard 8. Instructional strategies

The candidate shall understand and use a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.

Standard 9. Professional learning and ethical practice

The candidate shall engage in ongoing professional  learning, shall use evidence to  continually evaluate his or her practice, particularly the effects of his or her choices and actions on others, such as learners, families, other professionals, and the community, and shall adapt practice to meet the needs of each learner.

Standard 10. Leadership and collaboration

The candidate shall seek appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to: take responsibility for student learning; collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure leamer growth; and advance the profession.


**Student Learning Outcomes and Checkpoint information for the Master of Education (MED) program are listed under the MED section of the catalog.
Majors and Minors

Major Minor In-Seat Online

Courses

Study of the theories and research related to human development from conception through adulthood, including the developmental stages of infancy, childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, middle adulthood, and late adulthood. The interaction among the physical, cognitive and social aspects of development as well as the major theories of development and current research are discussed.

For More Information on EDU/PSY 260

This course is an introduction to teaching. The role of education in contemporary society, the history of education, and the nature of teaching is explored. Must attend Teacher Education Orientation to take this class.

For More Information on EDU 103

This course is an introduction to teaching. Topics covered include: the role of education in contemporary society, the history of education, different philosophies and objectives of elementary, middle, and secondary (high) school education. The nature of the school learner, goals, academic expectations and curriculum at each level are also studied in this course. Must attend Teacher Education Orientation to take this class.

For More Information on EDU 108

Candidates in Education are required to complete 200 field experience hours prior to graduation. This course represents the initial twenty field hours towards this requirement. Must attend Teacher Education Orientation to take this class.

For More Information on EDU 188

The course will explore the expanding use of technology in the educational setting. While major emphasis will be placed on the microcomputer in both the stand-alone or network setting and the laboratory or distributed environment, other technologies such as calculators, CD-ROM, television and interactive video, and digital cameras will be considered. Technology will be approached from both the aspect of assisting the educator with the instruction of students and in preparation of presentation materials, recordkeeping, etc. Must attend Teacher Education Orientation to take this class.

For More Information on EDU 201

Mathematics for Teachers I is the first of a two-semester sequence in the theory and practice of mathematics used in teaching children preschool through grade twelve. Prerequisite: admission to the Education program.

For More Information on EDU 202

This course is a study of the theories of learning and motivation. Learning styles and appropriate corresponding teaching styles and techniques are examined. Admission to the Education program usually occurs simultaneously while taking this course. Prerequisites: EDU 103, EDU 108 and admission to the Education program.

For More Information on EDU 210

Candidates in the Education are required to complete 200 field experience hours prior to graduation. This course represents the sixty elementary school field hours towards this requirement. Prerequisite: admission to the Education program.

For More Information on EDU 286

Candidates in the Education are required to complete 200 field experience hours prior to graduation. This course represents the sixty middle school field hours towards this requirement. Prerequisite: admission to the Education program.

For More Information on EDU 287

Candidates in the Education are required to complete 200 field experience hours prior to graduation. This course represents the sixty high school field hours towards this requirement. Prerequisite: admission to the Education program.

For More Information on EDU 288

Mathematics for Teachers II is the second of a two-semester sequence in the theory and practice of mathematics used in teaching children preschool through grade twelve. Prerequisite: admission to the Education program.

For More Information on EDU 302

Students will examine theories of development that impact the child and the development of developmentally appropriate curriculum. Additional topics include planning differentiated instruction, learning outcomes, and the effective use of assessment strategies. Research-based strategies will be examined that enable teachers to understand, manage, and respond effectively to classroom behavior. Students will explore classroom environments that meet the cognitive, social, emotional, and physical needs to the child. Required for Education Studies majors only.

For More Information on EDU 305

Schools are primary agents of socialization. This is a course designed to increase the student’s knowledge and awareness of diverse classroom populations. The course will focus on enhancing critical thinking skills when teaching cultural diversity and differentiation for diverse learners. It will examine learning styles affected by cultural diversity and exceptionalities such as language, disability, and the intellectually gifted, and their impacts on classroom teaching and learning. The course will introduce behaviorist and constructivist strategies for accommodating areas of exceptionalities and assessing their impacts upon student learning styles. Prerequisites: EDU 210 and admission to the Education program.

For More Information on EDU 314

This course is designed to provide a cross-categorical survey of knowledge concerning the identification, evaluation, education, learning characteristics, and academic/social needs of exceptional children and youth. Course content will review the categories of exceptional individuals in terms of mental, physical, and emotional characteristics. Major emphasis will be focused upon current trends, issues, legislation, and educational procedures as they relate to the integration of exceptional students in regular classroom settings. Prerequisites: EDU 103, EDU 108, EDU 210, and admission to the Education program. Field Experience required.

For More Information on EDU 315

This course provides an in-depth study of characteristics of children and youth with learning and/or behavior problems. Course content will also include a review of recent brain research, the concept of multiple intelligences, different learning styles, and differentiated instruction relative to the planning and provision of an appropriate educational program for children/youth with learning/behavior problems. Prerequisites: EDU 315 and admission to the Education program. Field Experience required.

For More Information on EDU 321

This course provides an in-depth study of specific characteristics and needs of secondary students who experience learning and/or behavior problems. Course content will emphasize factors to consider in planning and providing appropriate educational programs for students integrated into regular classroom settings. Activities will include evaluation, design, and implementation of alternative approaches/strategies for LBD students in basic skill areas of reading, writing, and mathematics. Discussion will also include preparation of LBD secondary students into the work world. Prerequisites: EDU 315 and admission to the Education program. Field Experience required.

For More Information on EDU 329

This course is a study of evaluation principles relative to academic, social, and personal characteristics of children and youth. Formal/informal evaluation and diagnosis as a basis for writing Individual Education Programs (IEPs) will be emphasized. Applied behavior analysis will be contrasted with alternative evaluation techniques. Prerequisites: EDU 315 and admission to the Education program.

For More Information on EDU 332

This course includes the foundational knowledge of literacy. Emphasis is on reading research, historical background, theories, and key vocabulary in the field of literacy, as well as, the influences of cultural and linguistic diversity on reading and language development. Prerequisite: admission to the Education program.

For More Information on EDU 338

This course emphasizes the integration of theory, research, and practice necessary for understanding, influencing, and impacting positive behavior changes in children and youth. Emphasis is placed on identification of observable behaviors, performing task analysis, structuring learning environments, selecting and implementing behavior management strategies, and utilizing methods for monitoring behavior changes. Prerequisites: Completion of EDU 360 and EDU 315 and admission to the Education Program. Field Experience required.

For More Information on EDU 340

The focus of this course is the utilization of instructional technology, appropriate materials, and community resources available for remediating/reinforcing skills and influencing positive behavior changes. Students will have ample opportunities to analyze appropriateness of materials, adapt, and create materials for use with children/youth experiencing learning and/or behavior problems. Opportunities will also be provided for students to operate technology hardware and make software decisions. Prerequisites: Completion of EDU 201 and EDU 315 and admission to the Education Program. Field Experience required.

For More Information on EDU 350

This course is a study of the techniques of classroom management and discipline. The student develops space and time management skills, report writing skills, and testing and assessment strategies. Prerequisites: EDU 103 and EDU 210, and admission to the Education program. Field Experience required.

For More Information on EDU 360

The purpose of the course is to provide students with the foundations of literacy, the relationship between reading, writing, listening and speaking skills, provide a variety of instructional strategies, integrate literacy skills into the content areas, provide opportunities to view and use assessment data to inform instruction, and to review a variety of assessment tools to monitor student progress.

For More Information on EDU 370

This course emphasizes educational programming in academic areas of reading, writing, language, and math for elementary students experiencing learning and behavior problems. Course content activities will include reviewing skill sequences, analyzing evaluation data, writing academic objectives for IEPs, constructing lesson plans, utilizing alternative teaching strategies, and planning effective management of classroom time, space, and instruction. This course will also prepare students to interact with parents, conduct successful parent conferences, and design appropriate interventions for parents to implement at home. Prerequisites: EDU 315 and admission to the Education program. Field Experience required.

For More Information on EDU 380

The focus of this course is a review of the rationale, practice, and dynamics of the inclusion approach for exceptional children and youth in regular class settings. Emphasis will be on special needs of students with learning/behavior problems, alternative teaching strategies, and procedures for collaborating with regular classroom teachers. Prerequisites: EDU 315 and admission to the Education program.

For More Information on EDU 390

This course focuses on methods and materials for teaching language arts and reading at the secondary level and includes instruction and assessment to prepare English language arts teachers who are knowledgeable about language, an extensive range of literature, oral and written composition. Includes an examination of ways students respond to literature and read for different purposes. Literacy programs and the importance, processes, and skills of reading will also be addressed. Prerequisites: EDU 210, EDU 360, and admission to the Education Program.

For More Information on EDU 404

Methods and materials for teaching reading and language arts to elementary and middle school students. Emphasis will be on language development and the integration of reading, listening, talking, writing, viewing, and visual representation skills in the language arts/reading classroom and across the curriculum. Students will explore the writing process and writing workshop. Prerequisites: EDU 210, EDU 360, and admission to the Education Program.

For More Information on EDU 405

This course focuses on methods and materials for teaching social studies to elementary and middle school children. Students will demonstrate an understanding of historical perspective, geography, economics, government and civics, and culture and society as they relate to the classroom.

For More Information on EDU 419

This course focuses on methods and materials for teaching math at the secondary level. Included is a variety of instructional strategies, math curricula, and plans for designing and implementing laboratory and field based learning activities. Prerequisites: EDU 210, EDU 360 and admission to the Education program.

For More Information on EDU 420

This course will prepare students to acquire the knowledge base to be effective teachers in the content area of science. The course includes instructional practices that will give the students the understanding of the elements in designing units of study in science. Attention will be given to practical experiences and assignments that will have a direct impact on the teaching of science.

For More Information on EDU 421

This course offers an overview of math teaching methods for elementary and middle school education majors. The course includes emphasis on the research that underlies current best practices in methodology, on theoretical foundations of teaching math, and on practical applications of theory.

For More Information on EDU 425

The student is assigned to an appropriate program or educational setting for one semester. The student will spend eight weeks in each of two separate environments. Early elementary placements must span not less than three age levels. Prerequisites: senior standing, completion of professional education requirements, completion of all other coursework and formal application for student teaching.

For More Information on EDU 498

The student will be assigned to an appropriate regular education program or educational setting for a half-semester (sixteen weeks). This practicum is designed for non-certification majors.

For More Information on EDU 499

This course is designed to provide candidates with the materials, knowledge and information to be able to perform their role as a teacher leader effectively. Topics covered include evidence-based characteristics of effective teacher leadership, confidence, communication, collaboration, improving teaching, and continuous improvement.

For More Information on EDU 501

This course provides candidates with opportunities to examine student data from their current school setting and collaborate with school personnel while assuming a leadership role in their professional learning community or other collaborative team in order to make instructional and assessment decisions which impact P-12 student learning. In this course, candidates learn to analyze student data and use the findings to identify achievement gaps, research applicable methods to address these gaps, and finally develop a plan to address the learning needs of an underserved population in their school.

For More Information on EDU 502

Disciplinary literacy explores the identities, habits of mind, and scaffolded instructional approaches necessary to increase the comprehension of discipline specific complex texts among students in middle and high school. Employing a Gradual Release of Responsibility (GRR) model, candidates will learn how to mentor their students to become increasingly independent in accessing and understanding complex text from different academic disciplines. Drawing on the knowledge, skill, and habits of mind acquired in the course, candidates are expected to become a coaching resource in disciplinary literacy for their respective academic disciplines and departments.

For More Information on EDU 504

Examine the legal system, the role it plays in the educational setting, and the practical application of legal concepts and how they apply to the numerous daily decisions teachers make. Primary attention is devoted to federal and state laws which serve to define the legal rights and responsibilities of teachers.

For More Information on EDU 506

This course is designed to provide the teacher leader with the fundamental knowledge and dispositions to implement best practices in professional learning community activities; collaborating, coaching, and mentoring with teachers in job-embedded experiences to successfully improve student achievement; and teach the fundamental tenets of professional development and presentation skills. This course will also provide candidates with leadership skills for working in schools with students, colleagues, and the community.

For More Information on EDU 507

This course offers an examination of professional development as embedded in the daily practice of teaching and leadership and essential to the establishment of a learning community. Through job-embedded professional development opportunities aligned with individual needs, students will develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of a teacher leader. This course provides opportunities for the student, the faculty mentor, and other professionals to work collaboratively with local school districts on programming, instruction, and skills as they relate to teacher leadership development and assessment for student learning.

For More Information on EDU 508

This course is a study of issues presently impacting the educational environment. All age perspectives (P-12) and all levels (local, regional, state, and national) are explored in this class. Students are asked to research and explore the past, present, and future of selected topics through an examination of current media sources, professional journals and books, and field practices. Through critical reflection and research, students are challenged to make direct applications into what is best for education. The content of the course will change as political, legal and educational perspectives change

For More Information on EDU 509

This course focuses on characteristics of diversity, equity, and social justice as they impact the classroom, school, and community. Teacher leaders will explore current trends and practices, developmentally appropriate assessment and instruction, and accommodating differences in learners.

For More Information on EDU 511

This course is designed as a guide to conduct research in classrooms. It provides candidates with an understanding of the nature, procedures, and applications of action research. Qualitative and quantitative methods are included. EDU 529 cannot be taken in the first year of one’s program.

For More Information on EDU 529

This course is the culminating action research project (Teacher Research Project) on a pre-approved topic, combining the candidate’s Professional Growth Plan with the School Improvement Plan. Prerequisites: All other MED coursework must be completed either prior to or concurrently with this course during the final semester. EDU 531 cannot be taken in the first year of one’s program.

For More Information on EDU 531

This course focuses on methods and materials for teaching science secondary levels. Included is a variety of instructional strategies, curricula, and methods for designing and implementing laboratory and field-based learning activities. The course will also teach students essential elements of science unit planning. Prerequisites: EDU 210 and EDU 360 and admission to the Education program.

For More Information on EDU 410

Last updated: 08/09/2021